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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 328 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the united states because of the human rights violations alleged in the complaint. they sued the defendants for their role in these human rights violations in u.s. general personal jurisdiction of our courts. abouts nothing unusual suing a tortfeasor in our -- >> may i ask you about the statement you just made? personal jurisdiction was raised as a defense, right? >> personal jurisdiction was raised as an affirmative defense, but not raised in a motion to dismiss. >> and so your position is it was waived? >> yes. >> but it was not adjudicated. is there -- >> it was not adjudicated in this case. our position, it was waived when it was not raised in a rule 12 motion. >> what effects that commenced in the united states or that are closely related to the united states exist between what happened here and what happened in nigeria? >> the only connection between the events in nigeria and the united states is that the plaintiffs are now living in the united states and have asylum because of those events, and the defendants are here. there's no other connection between the events that took place in
's iraq, the first shia arab led state in history is iraq, but we never mention that. the united states cannot come to terms with the fact today that for the first time america and one of america's key regional pillars, egypt, is in place strategically. you doesn't mean they have to become pro-iranian. they are just in play. they're no longer reflective pro-american the iranian military the first time in 30 years can go through the suez. iran doesn't need syria anymore. american elites have a very hard time coming to terms with these facts. and an even harder time coming to terms with the reality that the arab awakening is accelerating erosion of american standing and position in the middle east, not iran's. but rather than face this reality, americans embrace, particularly elites here in washington, embrace the logic defined proposition that the same drivers of political change and powering islamists in arab countries will somehow transform the islamic republic into a secular liberal state. it is a logic defying proposition. still, reality is what it is. on the eve of 9/11, just over 1
or anywhere in the united states and all they need is a computer and an internet connection with an auto dialer company and the auto dialer company then has a connection to carriers and the telephone network or. the auto dialer -- the lead generator is just trying to find people for these products or services for these rachel calls so they are just going to blast out calls. some of these lead generators are calling the phone book and going sequentially through numbers and looking for bodies a lot like e-mail spam because the costs are so much low for now. the startup costs are lower, almost zero as brett mentioned earlier. you can get dialing in a few hours and you don't need a pbx. you don't need lots of copper line and he don't even need a phone. you just need your computer and internet connection, so they will send out these calls going through an auto dialer which will put them into the telephone network and they will go out all over the country. and a very small percentage of people and up answering them in listening to the message and the message will be like one you may have heard
. >> they're two of the most well-recognized journalists in the united states. pioneers and advocates. for more than two decades maria and george have informed million of hispanics through the popular evening newscast. their brand of journalism is characterized not only by subjective and perspectives, but also by a high degree of social advocacy. in the last three decades both have covered a wide range of news and have witnessed history in the making. >> mexico, oh, yes. >> from presidential elections around the world to the most destructive natural disasters. maria has interviewed dictators, revolutionaries, world leaders, heads of state in latin america, and in the united states. she was among the first female journalists to report from the war torn streets of baghdad. george has covered five wars and right after the terrorists attack on september 11th he drove all the way from miami to new york to report on the tragedy firsthand. once he even asked for a vacation to cover the war in afghanistan. an assignment that at the time the network deemed too dangerous. he's had very public e
-- that the united states provide. we are per expect we can't see perfect. we have brought enormous amount of public goods. your kids will grow up in a different world. and so that's what i've been to cussed on on than what are the source of our strength and how we new them. you can't renew those sources of strength without some kind of political comprise. now i would argue that we're actually two decisions two big decisions away from a melted up in the american economy. if we get a decision on the grand bargain, the kind of ten year time frame we would manage the cut and spending and tax increases and in investments, we need do all three. we need to tax, cut, and invest in the source of our strength. i think that would have a huge effect. i think americans today feel in many ways like children of two divorced parents. i think it's a pal in the country in a lot of ways. it would be huge. if we got a grand bargain on energy how to exploit the boundary of -- i think the two together would have a huge impact. so the question is how close are we to that? and, you know, i have a saying about the middle e
in an interview the united states both economically and militarily and also in terms of its overall influence, really is as strong as it's ever been. he said this on february 21st, 2012 in case you want to pinpoint at least that statement. tom, do you agree with the assertion that right now or in 2012 the united states is as strong as it's ever been? >> that depends, david come if you were speaking about strong, relative in to houma? and in what area. i think there is no question in terms of influence. and on the global stage where the country that is most emulated in the world. but it is possible as mohammed said the world's cleanest dirty shirt also. and so come on a really prefer to think about american strength and i have to answer this question in a little bit of detail in terms of what are the things that have made us strong to start with? and i would argue that we had a formula for success in this country and was built on five pillars. one was educate our people love to and beyond what the technology was so we could get the most out of it. so it was universal primary education, the fac
to accept the right of a sovereign state, a member of the united nations as a viable state, a state which is legitimate, is unacceptable from any point of view. from any aspect and angle whatsoever. we cannot accept the iranians will be allowed to legitimize another state whatever it is. and certainly not from our point of view not israel. they will have swallow two bitter pills not one. one pill will be the pill of the threat nuclear threat and the other will be the threat of accepting israel right to exist. despite the rhetoric we are hearing from teheran, i believe that many iranians in places of power understand that israel is here to stay. they realize that israel not going disappear as it will not disappear. and therefore, they will have to come terms with this reality. and these two elements means to say in order to achieve the aim, you have to find ways of giving them what did i say a few minutes ago? to resort to the use of dignity. it's a different good thing to do. it's very difficult. i'm not saying it's going to be easy. i think it's something we have to do. because we have t
gets arrested for his activities. he spends three years in jail before returning to the united states in deciding to dedicate his entire life to saving north koreans. you cannot possibly read this book without being profoundly moved without frankly been moved to tears and just about every single chapter. and the stories are incredible. we will go into greater detail in some of these momentarily. melanie kirkpatrick, i'm jay lefkowitz will introduce shortly uses the best of her journalist sensibilities honed in three decades at "the wall street journal" to highlight the human side of the tragedy of north korea and we are deeply proud and we look forward to her comments today. copies of "escape from north korea" are available for purchase at today's event for $20 melanie curt -- it would be glad to send your copy. it's also available at amazon.com. buy your shallow view another online booksellers to read it, discuss it and read it again. i now have a special pleasure of introducing my friend, jay lefkowitz. shea is a senior partner at kirkland and alice here in new york city. jay is a w
at an advantage and disadvantage to those other countries including the united states, that it is taking advantage of and finding ways around some of the rules and procedures that exist under the world trade organization and we have to use that mechanism but it doesn't deal with all issues. it isn't clear whether it deals with the currency question. it may be difficult to use wto mechanisms to address some of the things the chinese government is doing through the so-called state owned enterprises to give them an advantage and make it more difficult for outsiders to compete for a share of the market. the point i would make overall is we have to find ways to exert leverage, and we have to pursue an integrated strategy that deals with this full range of issues. i guess since i am thinking of it i have a third point that agrees with jeff to the extent it can be a multilateral effort because i think we share important interests with other and dealing on these issues. >> the final and concluding question tonight will be from garrey wong left teach for china sent to us by e-mail and the question is addre
of the united states ought not accept any soviet control over eastern europe. we ought to deal with each of these countries separately. we ought to pursue strategies with each of them, economic and the rest, that help them pull away from their dependence upon the soviet union. where the soviet union has acted irresponsibly, as they have in many of those countries, especially, recently, in poland, i believe we ought to insist that western credits extended to the soviet union bear the market rate. make the soviets pay for their irresponsibility. that is a very important objective -- to make certain that we continue to look forward to progress toward greater independence by these nations and work with each of them separately. >> mr. president, your rebuttal. >> yes. i'm not going to continue trying to respond to these repetitions of the falsehoods that have already been stated here. but with regard to whether mr. mondale would be strong, as he said he would be, i know that he has a commercial out where he's appearing on the deck of the nimitz and watching the f- 14's take off. and that's an
this serious occur in an administration and have a president of the united states in a situation like this say he didn't know? a president must know these things. i don't know which is worse, not knowing or knowing and not stopping it. and what about the mining of the harbors in nicaragua which violated international law? this has hurt this country, and a president's supposed to command. >> mr. president, your rebuttal. >> yes. i have so many things there to respond to, i'm going to pick out something you said earlier. you've been all over the country repeating something that, i will admit, the press has also been repeating-that i believed that nuclear misses could be fired and then called back. i never, ever conceived of such a thing. i never said any such thing. in a discussion of our strategic arms negotiations, i said that submarines carrying ssiles and airplanes carrying missiles we more conventional- type weapons, not as destabilizing as the land-based missiles, and that they were also weapons that -- or carriers-that if they were sent out and there was a change, you could call them back
that it goes unremarked upon. if you want to know about a country look at the map of the united states in terms of the harbors from the east coast of the united states, the 13 colonies jam packed with natural harbors. the coast of africa collectively few good natural harbors but the east coast was packed with them and the continental corporation of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the ten per zone the european enlightenment with inland waterways flowing in a convenient east west fashion than the west the caressed combined and our ideas and dhaka sees but because of where we happen to live as well that's why these things matter. why these things matter. they've allowed india and china to develop into the completely distinct great worlds of civilization we have much to do with each other through long periods of history. >> let's take that image that you've offered of america, this place with all these great natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave it to the development of what we think of as the united states. it wasn't
>>> this is "gps," the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world, i'm fareed zakaria. the debates have done, the race is heading for the final stretch, and it is still all about the economy. so we'll start with a great panel it to see talk about the american economy, who is actually going on. >>> then, you've often heard that fracking is controversial. why? we have a debate to help you think it through. >>> and do you think you have enough money? what would be enough? we'll have a fascinating discussion on the subject with lord robert skidelsky, britain's most prominent economic historian o how to answer those questions. >>> and why in the world did the nation of mali get more mention this week in the debate than all of japan, mexico, or europe? >>> first, my take. the international monetary fund's latest world economic outlook makes for gloomy roading. growth projections have been revised downward almost everywhere, especially in europe and the big emerging markets like china. yet when looking out over the next four years, coincidentally
. a lot of people i've heard about the trade conflict between the united states and china on solar panels. this is an interesting prism to view the chinese economy more broadly because this is a classic case of china really pushing hard for big innovation and winding up with little innovation that doesn't get them to where they want to go and part of china's innovation policy is targeting strategic emerging industries. these are the industries that beijing thinks will be the industry's of the future. the biggest is green energy including solar and wind and electric vehicles and other green energy technologies so they have unleashed a lot of funding to support grain energy innovation. most of that funding has created instead of mosul products continuing the same old model process innovation which is making the products created in the west faster and cheaper and therefore using that to take away some of the u.s. market share. they've been very successful doing that on solar energy. china is making solar panels at lower prices than other countries around the world and therefore they are subs
tells well. the time i served in the united states senate i've been an independent voice for the people in the state and i've gotten results from the people of the state. in this campaign today, seven newspapers have made an editorial the as to who they would endorse. and all seven endorsed my candidacy. one of the reasons, not the only but one of the reasons that those newspapers endorsed me from the spread to california and a lot of places in between because of my record and the results that i achieved for the people in the state either leading the fight to cut the payroll tax for millions of americans and in pennsylvania so they could of dollars in the pocket to be doubled to invest in the economy, trade adjustment when the workers lose their jobs because of the unfair foreign competition and i let the fight pass that legislation given the training they need to get back on their feet. the so-called dredging plastic the deepening of the channels on was the key player in getting the most recent funding for that so getting results is key for the economy, and i have the honor to have ser
immigrated to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> reyna grande what is -- >> the way i grew up knowing it was a reference to the united states but to me because i grew up in this hometown surrounded by mountains and i didn't know where the united states was, to me it was the other side of the mountain. and during that time when my parents were gone working here in the u.s., i would look at the mountains and think that my parents were over there on the other side of the mountains. >> where did you grow up and originally where were you born? >> i was born in mexico in southern mexico and the little city that no one has heard of. when i mention acapulco everyone knows i'll could poke so it was a few hours away from acapulco. >> windage of parents come to the united states? >> my father came here in 1977 when i was three years old and he sent for my mother a few years later so my mother came in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. >> when did you come to the united states? >> i came to united states in 1985. >> how old were you? >> in may of 1985, i
talks about her experience growing up in mexico without her parents immigrated to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> host: reyna grande, what is [speaking in spanish] >> guest: [speaking in spanish] the way i grew up knowing [speaking in spanish] was a reference to the united states. but to me, because i grew up in this hometown surrounded by mountains and i didn't know where the united states was, to me it was the other side of the mountain. during that time that my parents were gone, working here in the u.s., i would look at the mountains and think my parents were on the other side of those mountains. post a word as you grow up -- which is where we borne? >> guest: i was born in mexico and a little town that nobody has heard of. but when i mentioned, it is three hours away. >> host: when did your parents come to the united states? how old were you? >> guest: my father came in 1877 when i was two years old and he sent for another three years later. savanna that came in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. poster wanted to come to the unit
the campaign coverage and look at folks who serve as role models here in the united states and abroad. there are four change makers, britain's former prime minister tony blair as he puts it, is much too young to consider retirement. he's traveling the world as a global politician and problem solver. then a young woman who survived disaster. she was a swimsuit model when she was caught in the 2004 tsunami. and carolyn miles the ceo to save the children. she's no stranger to educating and feeding kids around the world. but you might be surprised to hear what she's doing to help poor children right here at home. and that brings us to charles best. he has come up with a brilliant way for people who want to donate money for specific projects and public schools. first tony blair why it's so important to continue working and keep an open mind. >> i think the big big battle of the world is between the open mind and the closed mind. the open mind looks at the problem and sees potential and culture and say that's interesting. then there are those who say this is a threat. i want to close it dow
secretary of state of the united states, the hon. hillary rodham clinton. [cheers and applause] >> thank you. thank you. it is wonderful to be back here at georgetown and at one of the most beautiful the news, not only in washington, but anywhere, to have this chance to talk with you about an issue that will definitely shape your future. and to share with you some thoughts about what that actually means. as the lancaster said, i am a hoya by marriage. i am so proud to be that and so grateful for the extraordinary contribution that the school of foreign service makes to the state department. we are in reached every single day, dean lancaster, but the work and scholarship that goes on here at this great university. so i came here because it is not only that young people have a great state in our policies at home and abroad about energy, but because we all have to work together to find answers to some of the challenges that it poses. energy cuts across the entirety of u.s. foreign policy. it is a matter of national security and global stability. it is at the heart of the global economy. it is a
, reporting on the largest manhunt in modern california history. booktv visits the united states naval academy. politics, history, and war will be covered. visit booktv.org for a complete schedule of this week's programming and watch as all become weekend long on c-span2 and a booktv.org. up next, dakota meyer talks about the battle in afghanistan and his efforts to rescue soldiers that were ambushed by taliban forces. dakota meyer became the first living marine to receive the medal of honor since the vietnam war. this is about 45 minutes. >> i would like to welcome everybody. this is my official welcome. we are honored to have you here today. we are part of an elite club of authors. there are many that are active here in the american legion post the other thing i want to mention is each of you have a card that looks something like this. several years ago, we began a program called support the troops. the weather was books or dvds or even ipods, batteries, some of the things that they let us know that they needed, and we collected a few boxes and sent them to the troops. each year it has gotte
in los angeles. william? >> well, shepard, these weapons sold in the united states and smuggled south continue to produce a staggering body count in mexico. brian terry was one victim. but now univision the spanish language network produced a bombshell documentary that puts a human face on this american scandal with guns traced to fast and furious killed 18 drug rehab center in juarez late in 2009. months later the cartel hit mass cerd 16 at a teenager's birthday party. >> they feel helpless. they don't know what to do and they say who is going to pay for this? by cross-referencing weapons weapons sold in mexico. hundreds of fatalities to the u.s. program. while the mexican government has offered little criticism of the u.s. administration from which it receives hundreds of millions of dollars in aid. the victims are hoping to find justice in u.s. courts. >> go and sue in the united states with these american lawyers. >> now attorney general eric holder did not fire anyone for fast and furious. we are told reviews internally are underway for about a dozen officials. inspector general
. thinking has been around for several hundred years. under the united states constitution the ability to create money as part of the united states prompted the united states constitution. forever 200 years a lot of that has been outsourced to the private-sector, today least 90% of our money supply so to speak is produced by the commercial banking industry. i am not even mentioning some of the other parts of the financial services industry. for the last nearly 100 years, the fed has been involved and not outsourcing. and the lender of last resort is there to support the banking industry. and for the last 75 plus years we have the fdic providing another part of the federal safety net, to make the banking industry the commercial banking industry much more robust. so to me this is all about the safety net. but it is also time to roll back the safety net, because when we think about the money supply, what we used to pay for things, that is where we have the safety net here. it also need to recognize the the united states dollar is holding be fed currency of the world. many of our transacti
to the united states given a zero corporate tax rate environment. are you hearing these things from these other two guys? no, not even remotely close. they're arguing over who's going to spend more money on medicare. romney says he wants to balance the federal budget, but that he wants to increase spending for the military. well, it doesn't add up. and if we want to believe in the things that these guys are saying, then i guess we belief in the easter bunny and santa claus and by extension the tooth fairy and, steve, i don't think thai coming. >> host: gary johnson is with us, and want to remind viewers we'll a add a fourth line this morning for third-party voters, 202-585-3883 is your line, and we'll get to your calls in just a couple moments. at this point, um, governor johnson, what's the strategy for the rest of the election? where are you focusing most of your time and attention right now? >> guest: oh, right now there's a lot of attention that's being drawn to what it is that i am saying. i'm being recognized now for being at 6% nationally. um, i'll just ask you an obvious question here t
. judgment is what we look for in the president of the united states of america. >> you can see more from this foreign-policy debate for the 2004 campaign later tonight along with other debates from our archives. watch the 84 debate between ronald reagan and walter mondale. from 1988, george bush and massachusetts gov. michael dukakis. that is all starting at 7:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. >> the candidates are heidi heitkamp and rick berg. this is a little less than one half hour. >> welcome to the continuing coverage of election 2012. this is the debate where north seat.a is a u.s. senate sen i am here with berg and heidi heitkamp. thank you so much for being here. both candidates will have a bottom in the closing statement. there will be topics as i mean where there will be discussion and debate. >> thank you. i would like to thank everyone watching. this election may be the most important election in our lifetime. if we did i get our country back on track on the road to growth and prosperity, my children will not inherit the same country we do. i will fight against barack obama's f
for the one eyed terror suspect extradicted here to the united states the we have new details from the hearing today. plus, some people are paying $5 and even up to $6 a gallon for gas! a fillup under those numbers could cost hundreds of bucks for some trucks. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios >>shepard: the one eyed terror suspect today pleaded not guilty for plotting to set up a terrorist training camp. in oregon. he and four others suspected terrorists arrived in the united states on saturday after they lost a legal battle to keep them in british custody. the terrorist suspect lost part of his arm in a fight against the soviets in afghanistan back if the day. they say he usually wears a hook but today he appeared in court with no hook, no nothing. a prison spokesman said they would not comment on individual inmates but in general, they remove prosthetics if they could pose a danger to anyone else. the chief fox correspondent is live outside the courthous
the united states government or any other organization i'm a part of, and therefore, now, i can be a troublemaker. i'm focusing on the countries of egypt, libya, and tunisia, and focus more on egypt because i spent 20 years on the country, lived there for six years, and there for six weeks during the summer time. algeria and morocco have been peaceful, but don't count on it. algeria and libya or net oil exporters to help them get on their feet if they do not focus too much on that. as the ambassador said, libya's back to 1.4 million barrels a day, almost miraculous given the countries that have gone through things like this. algeria produces about the same amount of oil as libya, but it has six times the people so there's a lot more people to spread that across. algeria produces 2.3 cubic feet of gas a year, and if you do the math, it's a billion cubic feet per person in both countries, and if distributed nicely, everyone would be well-off, but we all know that's not the way it is. egypt is a net oil importer. it is a gas exporter, but right now, mostly lng because the pipelines
. it was a reference to the united states, but, to me, because i grew up in this hometown surrounded by mountains, and i didn't know where the united states was, to me, it was the other side of the mountains, and during that time, my parents were gone working here in the u.s.. i looked at the mountains and think my parents were over there, on the other side of those mountains. that was that to me. >> host: originally, where were you born? >> guest: in mexico, southern mexico in a little city that no one heard of, but when i mention alcapaco, everybody knows that. it was three hours from there. >> host: when did your parents come to the united states? how old were you? >> guest: my father came here in 1997 when i was two years old, and he send for my mother a few years later in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. >> host: when did you come to the united states? >> guest: i came to the united states in 198 # 5. >> host: how old were you? >> guest: in may of 1985, nine and a half going on ten. >> host: what can you tell us about coming to the united states? what was your trek? >> guest: well,
worldwide of the united states military? two minutes, virgil goode. >> as i said, if i'm elected president i will balance the budget, and part of the cuts have to be in the department of defense. we cannot do as mitt romney and paul ryan suggest increase military funding by $2 trillion over the next decade. i support a strong defense. but we need to retrench rather than trying to be the policemen of the world. we have too many soldiers, too many troopers scattered around the world. our presence needs to be decreased around the world, not increased, and the united states should stop trying to be the overseer of the world. that will save us billions and billions of dollars. [applause] >> all right. governor johnson. >> we need to provide ourselves with a strong national defense. the operative word here is defense, not offense and not nation building. [applause] >> the biggest threat to our national security is the fact that we're bankrupt, that we're borrowing and printing money to the tune of 43 cents out of every dollar we spend. in promising to submit a balanced budget to congress in the ye
with the demonstrations themselves. but from their point of view, and this is, this is the dilemma from the united states too, this is the dilemma from the united states, you know, iran has exploited situations before. it has exploited situations before. there's the fear that it could exploit this one again, and that is why when we look, we do not know what to make of this group and where it stands on questions of democracy and participation and where it stands in its relationships with iran. we don't -- we have concerns about that. that are hampering our decision making. is there any other question? it's 12:00, we really need to close because of the cameras. so i guess i will say at this point thank you very much for coming. thank you to the panelists. [applause] and, again, we have a web site, www.mepc.org. i hope you visit it. [inaudible conversations] >> the middle east council wrapping up this discussion on foreign policy choices facing the next administration. we are going from this to the heritage foundation live now for a discussion on russia's role in the syrian civil war. this is just getting s
for united states citizens first. >> as double of the mexico i ran a completely out of the political system, i got elected republican governor and state that was 2-1 democrat and made a name for myself of vetoing legislation. i'd be done more legislation than the other 49 governors in the country combined. i b to add 750 bills, and thousands of line item vetoes, it made a difference when it can to billions of dollars worth of spending, it made a difference when it came to laws that would have told you are by what i could or couldn't do in the bedroom. host: here johnson reports that he will appear on the ballot in 48 states including some of battlegrounds. and in colorado, new hampshire and an ohio -- johnson could be a thorn in romney side if the election is close. and in virginia, virgil goode could be a problem for gov. romney in that state as well. here is more from a third-party presidential debate. with the other candidates. [video clip] >> there are 90 million voters who are not coming out to vote in this election. that is one out of every two of voters, twice as many as the number w
comprise not haphazardly but purposefully a history of the united states for the last 200 or so years. a number of these books have been best sellers. traitor to his class and the first american were both finalists for the pulitzer prize and you can see h. w. brands on tv all the time if you go to the history channel or turn on the tv, there he is. this book is -- i will hold this up again so you can see and recognize it easily at the book signing tend, it is a tremendous biography of ulysses grant filled with stuffed i certainly never knew and was delighted to find out. it is very authoritatively and readable. before we get to grant himself i wanted to ask bill a broad question about biography. here at the book festival there are a number of biographers. i have read several of these already, robert caro's latest volume in his massive history, biography of lyndon johnson. janet reed's biography leonard cohen, all these people at the book festival among others. david maraniss is here with a book about obama. i was curious because all these books are so different in terms of authors's a
poverty which is one-fifth of what the united states does. and they have that rate because they have serious social welfare state, a serious social welfare network. and before we talk about moving more away from that and more towards giving a greater role to the market in our society, we need too seriously address what is clearly one, not the only, but one very important component of why finland outperforms the united states on educational measures. >> so, i will say when i came back from a trip to finland people want to have school in evanston, they should probably move to finland because it is quite a different social contact that they have created there. so i don't actually, we speak in the education debate, i was not making it, to make clear, i think in general society, this is a huge problem and how think about this and talk about it. but within education i think there's great deal of attention to poverty. they are serve has been this morning. i think on all sides, dislike debate is a lot more common ground about poverty than you would know from the rhetoric. >> quick last word
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 328 (some duplicates have been removed)